Linkage Tool for the Healthy Cities Research Initiative

To achieve the goals and objectives of the CIHR Healthy Cities Research Initiative (HCRI), strong connections must be made across disciplines and sectors. One of the ways the HCRI is supporting the development of such connections is through this Linkage Tool.

This Linkage Tool is designed to facilitate partnerships between researchers as well as municipal or other government officials, NGOs, community-based organizations or other organizations to support the co-creation and mobilization of research evidence into programs, policies and practice that maximize the health potential of cities. This tool will help connect potential partners that are working in an area of mutual interest. For example, researchers could indicate to municipalities their interest in conducting research on specific matters involving existing data. Or, communities could indicate to researchers their interest in becoming a site for implementation projects.

Notice

IMPORTANT: To be included in the Linkage Tool, please complete this short form. Your information will be added to the table below during the next update.

The table below shows information submitted by researchers, municipal or other governmental officials, and representatives from NGOs, community-based organizations or other organizations that are interested in sharing information and/or forging collaborations in relation to the Healthy Cities Research Initiative.

Information is posted in the language in which it was submitted.

Information is provided on a voluntary basis and in no way confers any advantages in the evaluation and/or funding of applications.

The table will usually be updated weekly, until May 2021 and regularly thereafter.

Contact information
Name
Email
Affiliation
Province/Territory
City (optional)
Phone Number (optional)
Website Address (optional)
Role(s) Healthy Cities Research Initiative Component(s) of Interest Topic(s) of Interest Identified gap(s) and Additional Information

Bala Nikku         
bnikku@tru.ca
Thompson Rivers University
BC
Kamloops
250-828-5242
A&E Building

Social science and humanities researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Fellowship in Research and Knowledge Translation on Urban Housing and Health and Health

Aging, Health services and research policy, Housing, Social sciences and/or humanities, Public Policy, Urban planning, Other: Social Work and Social Policy  

Additional context: I am a trained social worker and educator. I am developing social work research approaches to Disaster and Green Social Work. My research interests include green social work, wildfire disasters in BC, Earthquakes in Asia, international social work, community health, patient oriented research tools, comparative social policy and university community engagement.

I am interested in partnering with colleagues across Canadian Universities from social work and social policy and other disciplines particularly health, nursing, geography, natural resources, environmental and earth sciences.

Karen Patte
kpatte@brocku.ca
Brock University
ON
St. Catharines
905-688-5550 x3882
Karen Patte

Health science researcher

Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Data Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, CIHR Sex and Gender Science Chair in Healthy Cities Public health, Gender and health, Health services and research policy, Mental health and addiction, Environments and health, Nutrition, metabolism and diabetes, Physical activity, Public Policy

My research focuses on social, psychological, and environmental influences on youth and emerging adult mental health and substance use over time; and how mental health relates to various health behaviours (sleep, physical activity, substance use, eating behaviour, etc.) and correlates (e.g., body weight, self perceptions of weight and appearance, etc.). I am the PI of the Mental Health project within the larger COMPASS Study (COMPASS PI: Dr. Scott Leatherdale). COMPASS is a  prospective cohort study (started in 2012) that uses a hierarchical quasi-experimental design to evaluate how programs, policies, and built environments impact various youth health behaviours and outcomes (substance use [tobacco, e-cigarettes, alcohol, cannabis, opioids], mental health, obesity, diet, physical activity, screen time, sleep, bullying) over time. Each year, COMPASS collects longitudinal data from ~70,000 grade Engineering sciences-Nutrition, metabolism and diabetes students and 120+ secondary schools across Canada (Ontario, Alberta, BC, Quebec, Nunavut) (i.e., student level, school administrator data surveys, and built environment data from within and surrounding schools). The project aims to build capacity and provide infrastructure to continually improve programs, policies, and resources for the advancement of youth mental health.

Shilpa Dogra 
Shilpa.Dogra@uoit.ca
University of Ontario Institute of Technology in the City of Oshawa (Region of Durham)
Ontario

Health science researcher

Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Data Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop, CIHR Sex and Gender Science Chair in Healthy Cities

Public health, Aging, Environments and health, Physical activity, Urban planning, Other: Transportation

Additional context:
I am primarily interested in active transportation in two contexts. First, in the context of an age-friendly city, I am interested in what can we do to make communities supportive of active transportation in older adults, and how we can accomplish this. Second, in the context of overall transportation, I am interested in positioning active transportation as a critical mode as our communities grow, both for health outcomes as well as for environmental outcomes. In the area of age-friendly active transportation, I have worked closely with our local municipality on projects that informed the City's application to the World Health Organization to be designated as an age-friendly city. In the area of overall transportation, I have worked closely with engineers and local municipal staff to better position and fight for prioritization of active transportation by tying it into municipal declarations of a "climate emergency".

I am interested in working with partners who can: 

  • assist with creating policies around active transportation, particularly e-bikes
  • support research on e-bikes and cycling infrastructure
  • provide expertise in measurement of environmental conditions
  • provide expertise in urban planning (complete streets)   

I am also interested in collaborating with other researchers on age-friendly city design, active transportation, and e-bikes.

Mariana Brussoni
mbrussoni@bcchr.ubc.ca
University of British Columbia
BC
604-875-3712       
brussonilab.ca

Health science researcher

Implementation Science Team Grants

Public health, Gender and health, Environments and health, Physical activity, Social sciences and/or humanities, Public Policy, Urban planning, Other: Child development

Additional context: My research focuses on child-friendly cities and supporting children's outdoor play, including design of cities and play environments, child-led urban planning, managing parent and adult fears, promoting social cohesion, developing municipal and other policies to support outdoor and risky play

Open to partnership with researchers, municipalities, community organizations on researching and supporting initiatives to promote children's outdoor play, active transport, safe routes to school, play streets, and other related initiatives.

Fatih Sekercioglu
fsekercioglu@ryerson.ca
Ryerson University
Ontario
Toronto
416-970-5000 ext. 553354
Fatih Sekercioglu

Health science researcher

Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop, Health System Impact Fellowship in Healthy Cities, Fellowship in Research and Knowledge Translation on Urban Housing and Health and Health, CIHR Sex and Gender Science Chair in Healthy Cities Public health, Aging, Gender and health, Health services and research policy, Housing, Indigenous health, Environments and health,            Public Policy, Urban planning

As an emerging scholar, I would like to develop research partnerships with academia and government organizations.

I look forward to connecting with members of academic institutions, NGOs, and government organizations to collaborate on environmental health-related research     www.ryerson.ca/
planetaryhealth/

Françoise Bichai
fbichai@polymtl.ca
Polytechnique Montréal
Québec
Montréal
514-340-4711 x4256
Françoise Bichai
Natural or engineering sciences researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop

Public health, Gender and health, Health services and research policy, Indigenous health, Engineering sciences, Natural sciences, Environments and health, Urban planning

Additional context: Resilience of urban water systems and services, water quality, water supply, risk management in water supply, integrated urban water management, water sensitive cities, alternative water sources (rainwater, stormwater, wastewater reuse) and decentralized systems, public health and water policy, urban water gouvernance, interdisciplinary and intersectorial approach to urban water management, urban water infrastructure and institutions

Interdisciplinary approach to planning and policy on urban water systems/infrastructure, services and institutions, integrating public and environmental health protection and reliability of supply. Interdisciplinary evaluation of risks from the source (e.g. of contamination) to the release in the environment following consumptive or non-consumptive use of water in cities. Comparison of social, environmental policies and technical /engineering measures to reduce risks in water supply and source protection. Example of linkages of interest: (1) I am interested in linking up with health experts (including mental health) and health/public policy experts to evaluate, namely, how changes in Canadian urban lifestyle (including workplace policies and work habits/patterns, including work-life balance policies) could impact our health and, specifically, how this could be reflected in the quality of the urban water cycle and thereby, of the environment. (2) I am interested in linking up with urban infrastructure planners at all levels (engineers, urban planners, policy makers) and the communities they serve to develop a water-sensitive city approach for Canadian cities (eg. in the Greater Montreal area). (3) Also interested in studying how we can transform higher education to better serve healthy cities in the future, namely in terms of managing the urban water cycle in face of increasing climatic and anthropogenic pressures.
Caislin Firth
caislin_leah_firth@sfu.ca
Simon Fraser University
British Columbia
Vancouver
Health science researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop, Fellowship in Research and Knowledge Translation on Urban Housing and Health

Public health, Gender and health, Health services and research policy, Indigenous health, Mental health and addiction, Environments and health, Social sciences and/or humanities, Public policy, Urban planning, Other: health equity; program evaluation

Additional context: My overarching research interests are to understand the impacts of policies on social and built environments and their influence on health inequities. This interdisciplinary research will leverage insights of city planners, policy makers, local health departments, community advocates, and scientists. My work will be critical to identifying mechanisms that can mitigate poor health outcomes and guide the development of policies that prioritize equity and build neighborhoods that ensure the health of all community members. I am currently a postdoctoral fellow with Interventions, Research and Action in cities team. I use implementation science and epidemiologic methods to assess the impacts of built environment interventions on population health and wellbeing across diverse populations. I work directly with city planners, neighborhood groups, and decision-makers to ensure findings resonate with community and produce knowledge products.

I am interested in the Health Cities Research Initiative Linkage Tool to build collaborative relationships with researchers, policy makers, and community organizations invested in (re)designing cities to improve health for all. I am particularly interested in engaging with individuals and programs interested in community participatory approaches. I have a strong background in evaluation, evaluating health impacts of government-funded programs and social policies in the Pacific Northwest, and using findings to support action on policy solutions.
Meghan Winters
mwinters@sfu.ca
Simon Fraser University
British Columbia
Vancouver
604-315-0484
CHATR Lab
Health science researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts Grants, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop, Health System Impact Fellowship in Healthy Cities, CIHR Sex and Gender Science Chair in Healthy Cities

Public health, Gender and health, Environments and health, Physical activity, Social sciences and/or humanities, Public policy

Additional context: My research program is interested in how community design impacts the way people get around and connect with each other. I work together with communities to understand the intersection of population health, urban environments, transportation and safety, producing evidence to support practice, policy, and programs. Research focus areas: Active transportation Urban form and healthy built environments Road safety Social connections and well-being Equity Public policy Crowdsourced data and citizen science Smart cities

I'm interested in working with communities to lead population health intervention research studies on the changes they are making to their cities. This may be changes to the built environment, or programs and policies to promote health and health equity. My current research projects & initiatives focus on the interrelated themes of urban built environments, mobility, active transportation, road safety, population health, equity, and public policy. I work with large, mid-sized, and (at times) small communities across Canada and beyond. Partnership and collaboration are a central operating value for my research program.
Daniel Fuller
dfuller@mun.ca
Memorial University of Newfoundland
Newfoundland and Labrador
St. John's
Walkabilly – Daniel Fuller
Health science researcher Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop Public health, Gender and health, Engineering sciences, Environments and health, Physical activity, Ethics, Urban planning, Musculoskeletal health and arthritis I would like to connect with city officials, practicing urban planners, or others who are interested in working together to answer policy relevant questions about cities and health.
Zoé Poirier Stephens
national@teaminteract.ca
The INTErventions, Research, and Action in Cities Team (INTERACT)
British Columbia; Saskatchewan;
Québec; Newfoundland and Labrador
514-890-8000 x 15903
INTERACT
University or healthcare support staff Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts Grants, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop, CIHR Sex and Gender Science Chair in Healthy Cities

Public health, Aging, Gender and health, Mental health and addiction, Environments and health, Physical activity, Social sciences and/or humanities, Public policy, Urban planning

Additional context: INTERACT is a pan-Canadian research collaboration of scientists, urban planners, public health officials, and engaged citizens uncovering how the design of our cities is shaping the health and well-being of Canadians. Seeing the city as a living laboratory, we use cutting-edge tools that harness the power of mobile technology, geographic information science, and cloud computing to measure changes in urban environments and the resulting impact on people’s mobility, interactions and well-being, including inequalities in both exposures and outcomes. Initially launching in four cities across Canada – Victoria, Vancouver, Saskatoon, and Montreal - INTERACT offers an innovative framework to evaluate the health impact of real world urban form interventions, developing tools that can easily be deployed across cities and interventions.

Syed Sibte Raza Abidi
ssrabidi@dal.ca
Dalhousie University
Nova Scotia
Halifax
NICHE Research Group
Natural or engineering sciences researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts Grants, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants Natural sciences
Additionnal context: Artificial Intelligence Digital Health/Health Informatics Data Analytics Health Data Science Virtual Care
Research and Training Collaborations
Mark Embrett
membrett@stfx.ca
St. Francis Xavier University
Nova Scotia
Antigonish
902-789-2534
Dr. Mark Embrett
Health science researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Health System Impact Fellowship in Healthy Cities, Fellowship in Research and Knowledge Translation on Urban Housing and Health

Health services and research policy, Housing, Mental health and addiction, Public policy

Additional context: With experience in interdisciplinary health policy research, my research focuses on health systems arrangements, health policy and knowledge translation, and public policies’ impact on a variety of prevalent health policy problems such as equity, access, and efficiency. I have co-investigated and led independent, local, and national research projects in mental health and interprofessional care. After receiving my PhD from McMaster University’s Health Policy Program and Dalhousie University’s Masters in Applied Health Services Research, I have worked in academic, private and government industries focusing on transition in care for youth with mental health issues, Social Impact Bonds for improving health project outcomes, digital health and health economic outcomes. I currently teaches courses on Health Systems and Health Policy (HLTH 39Musculoskeletal health and arthritis), Health Leadership (401), Health in All Policies (HLTH302), Social Determinants of Health (HLTH 102), and Health Innovation (HLTH 402).

I would like to work towards a Health in All Policies approach in Nova Scotia by connecting the various public sectors to insert health outcomes as a central part to city renewal and emerging policies.
Michael Brauer
michael.brauer@ubc.ca
The University of British Columbia
BC
Vancouver
Health science researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts Grants Public health, Environments and health Healthy built environment training
Melanie Langille
melanie.langille@nb.lung.ca
New Brunswick Lung Association
New Brunswick
Fredericton
NGO staff Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts Grants, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants

Public health, Environments and health, Other: health impacts of climate change

Additional context: For 20 years the New Brunswick Lung Association has been a national leader in environmental issues that affect lung health (air pollution, toxins, climate change), has participated on many national committees on air toxins, chemical and pesticide exposures, and has coordinated numerous public engagement programs aimed at reducing air emissions, greenhouse gases (GHGs) and other human exposures. The New Brunswick Lung Association offers bilingual service, being located in Canada’s only officially bilingual province, and is the national lead on environmental issues for the Canadian Lung Association (https://nb.lung.ca/). Building upon our national recognition for environmental health education, we are expanding our scope to include health effects of climate change, and reconnection of people with nature to reduce/prevent nature deficit disorder. We are experts in knowledge translation and have developed numerous public education programs to help the public improve their own health, especially in the areas of environmental exposures. Our team includes expertise in education (children, youth, and adult), environmental science, nursing, graphic design, social media, and donor relations.

In our continuing efforts to be a leader in public engagement on environmental health issues, we wish to partner with organizations that have the capacity to conduct primary research, market research, and large scale data analysis. Our contribution to the overall project would be in the area of knowledge translation and implementation to ensure that the data collected gets disseminated to the public and policy makers in a manner that is accessible and actionable. In addition to our lung health work, we host the Canadian Network for Human Health and the Environment, a network of over 400 health and environment professionals from coast to coast. Partnerships forged under this initiative may be expanded upon through our existing network to deliver knowledge products across the country.
Carolyn Côté-Lussier
carolyn.cote-lussier@ucs.inrs.ca
Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Urbanisation Culture Société
Québec
Montréal
Carolyn Côté-Lussier
Social science and humanities researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop

Public health, Environments and health, Physical activity, Social sciences and/or humanities, Urban planning

Additional context: Research interests: (i) Public safety perceptions, health, and quality of life. Feelings of safety, the urban environment (built and psycho-social environment), and mental and physical health. (ii) Public reactions to crime and political preferences. Perceptions of crime, criminal justice policy preferences, political ideology and moral systems. (iii) Social inequalities. Poverty trajectories, absolute and relative deprivation, intergroup relations and social structure. (iv) Advanced quantitative methods. Factor analysis, latent class growth analysis, structural equation models, quantile regression, multilevel modeling, missing data analysis.

I am interested in participating in research projects or training related to the physical and social urban environment, inequalities and methodological innovations in terms of measuring environmental exposures.
Mojtaba Parsaee
mojtaba.parsaee.1@ulaval.ca
École d'architecture, Université Laval
Québec
Quebec
514-519-3058
Natural or engineering sciences researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts Grants, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop, Health System Impact Fellowship in Healthy Cities, Fellowship in Research and Knowledge Translation on Urban Housing and Health

Public health, Health services and research policy, Housing, Indigenous health, Mental health and addiction, Engineering sciences, Natural sciences, Environments and health, Physical activity, Social sciences and/or humanities, Urban planning

Additional context: Architecture and biophilic design

collaboration and partnership
Fiona Boulet
fiona.boulet@ucalgary.ca
University of Calgary, makeCalgary Platform and Network
Alberta
Calgary
403-660-7423
makeCalgary
University or healthcare support staff Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants

Public health, Aging, Gender and health, Housing, Indigenous health, Mental health and addiction, Environments and health, Physical activity, Social sciences and/or humanities, Public policy, Urban planning

Additional context: Based within the University of Calgary, makeCalgary encourages collective problem-solving of contemporary urban challenges by bringing together multi-faculty, university researchers and municipal decision makers. Our interdisciplinary network acts as a pathway to progressive change through supporting dialogue on urban infrastructure and health-focused topics related to active living, mitigation of social vulnerabilities, and culture and leisure for community health. We are committed to conducting and translating research into policies and programs that have real and positive impact in our city by better understanding the link between urban design, municipal policies, and the many aspects of health.

We represent a network of researchers at the University of Calgary with different priorities but all with a focus on health in the city. Our platform could team up on projects around more precise topics (housing, aging populations, new Canadians, youth, …) and/or collaborate with teams with a broader range of topics around health, active living, and urban form. In addition to researcher connections, we offer direct linkages to and relationships with municipal policy decision-makers to others looking for such engagement.
Dr. Jason Gilliland
HEAL@uwo.ca
Human Environments Analysis Lab at Western University
Ontario
London
5196612111x81239
Social science and humanities researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop, Health System Impact Fellowship in Healthy Cities, Fellowship in Research and Knowledge Translation on Urban Housing and Health and Health

Public health, Health services and research policy, Mental health and addiction, Musculoskeletal health and arthritis, Natural sciences, Environments and health, Nutrition, metabolism and diabetes, Physical activity Social sciences and/or humanities, Public Policy, Economics, Ethics, Urban planning

Additional context: The Human Environments Analysis Laboratory (www.theheal.ca) is a state-of-the-art, multi-disciplinary research and training environment based at Western University which specializes in the production, evaluation, synthesis, dissemination and mobilization of evidence to support effective policies, programs and professional practice aimed at creating healthy and vibrant communities. The HEAL aims to develop highly-skilled researchers to create, disseminate, and mobilize knowledge for making healthy, thriving communities. HEAL faculty and students come from various academic disciplines, including geography, sociology, urban planning, engineering, landscape architecture, health sciences, epidemiology & biostatistics, neurosciences, paediatrics, and food and nutritional sciences. We specialize in applications of geographic information science (GIS) for addressing critical planning and public health issues. We also specialize in community-based research and strive to build authentic and mutually-beneficial partnerships with local community organizations, especially non-profits and charities.

The HEAL is open to partnerships with other researchers, community organizations, and government actors on topics related to children and youth, food environments, active travel, substance use, mental health, nature, and the social determinants of health. We would be particularly interested in projects or initiatives that involve GIScience, youth engagement, policy development, knowledge translation, or implementation science.
The HEAL is open to partnerships with other researchers, community organizations, and government actors on topics related to children and youth, food environments, active travel, substance use, mental health, nature, and the social determinants of health. We would be particularly interested in projects or initiatives that involve GIScience, youth engagement, policy development, knowledge translation, or implementation science.
Nathan Dawthorne
ndawthor@uwo.ca
London
Ontario
Social science and humanities researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Fellowship in Research and Knowledge Translation on Urban Housing and Health and Health, CIHR Sex and Gender Science Chair in Healthy Cities

Gender and health, Health services and research policy, Housing, Mental health and addiction, Social sciences and/or humanities, Public Policy

Additional context: As male sex work is understudied, between 2014 and 2017 I conducted ethnographic research for my 2018 Ph.D. dissertation, in London, Ontario, Canada, where no prior research with male sex workers exists. Forty-three men shared their stories via semi-structured interviews. Not only do I present original insight into demographics and prevalence rates, but also the socio-cultural aspects of the sex industry and male sex workers’ lives. This research also uncovers that these men, rendered invisible based on their gender, sexuality, and involvement in the sex trade, are facing various forms of systemic structural violence (including culturally, institutionally, and at the level of the family).

In assuming what sex workers need and want, a one-size-fits-all approach has not considered the lived experiences of men who sell sex nor the localized nuances of the sex industry. The existence of male sex workers (and female clients) disrupts gendered binaries of choice and constraint, which have informed the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act (PCEPA 2014) which criminalizes the purchase of and advertisement of sexual services. Social policies and laws with the mindset that (only) women are vulnerable, that the sex industry employs only women, and that the industry is inherently harmful, have served to pathologize, exclude and otherwise perpetuate myths. As such, the dissemination of my research into policy briefs, publications, and education campaigns will be ongoing as the implications for municipal, provincial, and federal policy and social services are profound. Men and boys, and in particular male sex workers, gay men, and male abuse survivors need representation in policy and the construction or incorporation of their needs into existing structures is paramount especially in areas where this is lacking such as London Ontario. We understand the sex industry better when we approach it as highly intersectional, fluid, and subjective, rather than treating people and their experiences as fixed and homogenous. Since the sex industry and those within it are continually changing, ideally, I am looking to engage in further ethnographic research in the London region at intervals (e.g., 2021-2023; 2027-2029 and so on). This will establish prevalence patterns for on-going statistical analysis, account for any emergent forms of sex work and advertising technologies, economic and cultural trends, and changes in policies, services, and law enforcement strategies. Male sex workers can be found virtually everywhere. To develop a more generalized understanding of the men who sell sexual services (the male sex industry in Ontario) comparative analysis with other locations is necessary especially where no prior study has occurred such as Barrie, Sarnia, Windsor, and Niagara. A comparative analysis will account for context, examining localized nuances, and assist in determining the broader needs of men living in these areas.
Dr. Frank Baiden MBChB PhD
baidenf@gmail.com
Institute of Public Health
Greater Accra
Accra
233208098000 / 233204591181
Health science researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop, Health System Impact Fellowship in Healthy Cities, Fellowship in Research and Knowledge Translation on Urban Housing and Health

Public Health, Gender & Health, Health services and research policy, Urban planning

Additional context: I have research interest in how urbanization is impacting the health of adolescents and young people and how this impacts risk of non-communicable diseases (including injury). How do establish a primary urban health care system that responds to this challenge and what we can learn from cross-cultural (cities) comparative studies.

I am interested in linking up with researchers who work in different settings and are interested in developing novel approaches that adapt the current practices in primary urban health care to the challenges posed by non-communicable diseases and diseases of epidemic potential
Diane Pruneau
diane.pruneau@umoncton.ca
Faculté des sciences de l'éducation, Université de Moncton
NB
Québec
4186678244
Social science and humanities researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants

Public health, Gender and health, Environments and health, Social sciences and/or humanities, Urban planning

Additional context: As a member of the SDSN network (Sustainable Development Solutions Network) I am interested in the solutions that people find in order to improve the quality of life and of the environment in cities. I am doing research on how to use design thinking and ICT to support people while they try to improve their cities.

I have a lot of experience in healthy cities education. With my research group, we have conducted many projects for improving some living conditions in New Brunswick villages and towns: Moncton, Dieppe, Cap-Pelé... Also in Morocco and other places in Canada: Ottawa, Québec city. I would like to be part of a team working in Québec or Ontario. I would not want to be the main researcher.
Martine Shareck
martine.shareck@usherbrooke.ca
Université de Sherbrooke
Québec
Health science researcher Healthy Cities Research Training Platform, Implementation Science Team Grants, Data Analysis Using Existing Databases and Cohorts, Healthy Cities Research Partnership Development Grants, Immersive Urban Healthy Policy Workshop, Health System Impact Fellowship in Healthy Cities, Fellowship in Research and Knowledge Translation on Urban Housing and Health, CIHR Sex and Gender Science Chair in Healthy Cities, Other: Participatory approaches in Healthy Cities research

Public health, Gender and health, Housing, Mental health and addiction, Environments and health, Social sciences and/or humanities, Public Policy, Urban planning

Additional context: (1) Assessing mechanisms linking urban environmental features, social determinants of health, and health outcomes among young people (adolescents and young adults); (2) Evaluating innovative interventions in the urban environment to understand what works to reduce social inequalities in health, how, and for whom; (3) Inclusion/exclusion of certain social groups from certain urban spaces; (4) Mixed-methods research

I am interested in building collaborative relationships with researchers, policy makers, and community organizations who share the goal of designing healthy cities that are inclusive of all, especially socio-economically marginalized groups. I would like to connect with others for whom young people's health and social inclusion is a central concern.
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