Linkage Tool for the Sepsis Research Network Initiative: List of interested individuals

Notice

IMPORTANT: We invite you to complete this short survey. Once complete, your information will be added to the table below to facilitate collaborations.

The information is provided in the language in which it was submitted by the respondent.

The table below shows information about researchers, individuals and organizations interested in sharing information and/or forging collaborations in relation to the Team Grant: Sepsis Research Network.

The information was provided on a voluntary basis and in no way confers any advantages in the evaluation and funding of applications.

The information is provided in the language in which it was submitted by the respondent.

The table will be updated weekly, until the full application deadline (September 26, 2019).

Contact information
Name
Email
Phone Number (optional)
Province/Territory
Website Address
Institution/Organization Focus Areas Current Position Additional Information
Joseph Ting
jting2@cw.bc.ca
604-875-2345
British Columbia
Dr. Joseph Ting – BC Children’s Hospital
University of British Columbia
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Clinical Investigator & Clinical Associate Professor Dr. Ting is also the site investigator for the Canadian Neonatal Network at the British Columbia Women’s Hospital. Conducting collaborative research is one of his many passions in hopes of enhancing neonatal-prenatal health.
Cheryl Peters
cheryl.peters@cw.bc.ca
778-981-9478
BC Children’s Hospital
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
  • Understanding the roles metabolism and nutrition may play in the treatment and outcomes for patients with sepsis
Anesthesiologist and Critical Care I am interested mostly in prevention, detection and management of sepsis.
John Marshall
marshallj@smh.ca
416-864-5225
Ontario
inFACT
St. Michael's Hospital/CCCTG/InFACT
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
  • Understanding the roles metabolism and nutrition may play in the treatment and outcomes for patients with sepsis
Professor of Surgery I lead an international collaboration of investigator-led trials groups known as the International Forum for Acute Care Trialists (InFACT); InFACT is developing an international initiative on the staging and stratification of critical illness. I also lead a CIHR-funded basic research program on neutrophils in sepsis, and a CIHR-funded clinical research program that seeks to develop a novel and cost-effective model for clinical trials - the platform trial - as a means to support collaborative clinical research through the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group. I am a past-chair of the International Sepsis Forum, and a member of the executive of the Global Sepsis Alliance.
Alison Fox-Robichaud
afoxrob@mcmaster.ca
9058705801
Ontario
Alison Fox-Robichaud Biography
McMaster University
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
  • Understanding the roles diabetes mellitus and glucose control have on outcomes in patients with sepsis
  • Understanding the roles metabolism and nutrition may play in the treatment and outcomes for patients with sepsis
Professor Medicine I have started an application as NPA, I have the support of the CCCTG, CCCTBG, have engaged PERC, CAEP members in sepsis and working on engaging the Diabetes Canada. I have made contacts across Canada to engage most known sepsis scientists and intensivists that would be interested in being part of the team. I am also the current president of the Canadian Sepsis Foundation a NFP that is working to advocate for sepsis in Canada. We have also been working with the Sepsis Patients Facebook group, who will be providing patient partners. I have engaged diabetes and population health scientists. We have contacts with our group would value connections to nutrition scientists and any other individuals who would be interested in studying patients with sepsis.
Mark Ansermino
anserminos@yahoo.ca
British Columbia
Mark Ansermino Biography
The University of British Columbia
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
  • Understanding the roles metabolism and nutrition may play in the treatment and outcomes for patients with sepsis
Professor Director of the Centre for International Child Health at British Columbia's Children's Hospital. Co-lead (with Prof Tex Kissoon) of the Pediatric Sepsis Data CoLab.
Gedas Cepinskas
gcepinsk@uwo.ca
519-685-8500 ext 55073
Ontario
Lawson Health Research Institute - Critical Illness
Lawson Health Research Institute
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Scientist/Program Director While our Program (Centre for Critical Illness Research at Lawson HRI-established in 1994 to investigate pathogenesis of organ dysfunction in sepsis and other systemic disorders) does not directly investigates the roles of diabetes mellitus and glucose control have on outcomes in patients with sepsis, we, however, have strong expertise in animal model(s) of diabetes and are well positioned to address "diabetes-sepsis" research axis in pre-clinical models. In addition, well-recognized "Diabetes Research Group" in London, ON is available for immediate collaborative work. Finally, we have strong clinical team (lead by Dr. Claudio Martin; Critical Care Medicine) with a long-lasting commitment in clinical sepsis research.
Monica Gorassini
monica.gorassini@ualberta.ca
7804922463
Alberta
University of Alberta - Motor Control Labratory
University of Alberta
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
Professor I work in the motoneuron field and I am collaborating with Dr. Mark Rich from Wright State University on the role of motoneurons in ICU acquired weakness. Mark (working with Tim Cope) has a rodent model of sepsis and has found that a decrease in persistent sodium channel activation prevents the motoneuron from firing properly, contributing to muscle weakness (see Nardelli et al., Ann Neurol 82: 961-971, 2017). I would like to record single motor unit activity in patients with ICU weakness using non-invasive, multi-electrode surface EMG arrays to determine if a similar problem with motoneuron recruitment and firing behaviour exists in humans. If you think this type of project would fit in well with your application, please contact me to discuss. Monica Gorassini (monica.gorassini@ualberta.ca), Edmonton, AB.
Niranjan Kissoon
Nkissoon@cw.bc.ca
604 875 2507
British Columbia
University of British Columbia
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Professor
Ivan
ibrukner@jgh.mcgill.ca
1 514 8038782
Quebec
OPTILAB
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Technical Lab Co-Director We are specially interested in novel technological platforms of direct from plasma NGS universal pathogen discovery/identification. We have strong collaboration with CompleteGenomics-BGI (USA-China) techno company with is emerging as attractive option over illumina and/or Ion Torrent technology. The Karius Inc is USA version of this "service" however, the price and accuracy of plasma/serum screening of 200 "blood cultures" per day (our hospital) will be facilitated by this approach, specially with goring segment of immunocompromised diabetic patients, where use of "state of the art" molecular tests with pre-defined list of pathogens is not good enough to cover 30-50% of unresolved cases. Turn Arrount Time within 24-48h...
Janos G Filep
janos.g.filep@umontreal.ca
514 0252-3400 ext 4662
Quebec
Janos G Filep Biography
University of Montreal
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
Professor Leukocyte biology (activation, apoptosis, efferocytosis) Endothelial cell biology Resolution of inflammation
Manish Sadarangani
msadarangani@bcchr.ubc.ca
British Columbia
Vaccine Evaluation Center
University of British Columbia
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Assistant Professor Director, Vaccine Evaluation Center, BC Children's Hospital Research Institute
Liam Brunham
liam.brunham@ubc.ca
British Columbia
Centre for Heart Lung Innovation
UBC
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Understanding the roles diabetes mellitus and glucose control have on outcomes in patients with sepsis
  • Understanding the roles metabolism and nutrition may play in the treatment and outcomes for patients with sepsis
Assistant Professor Our research focuses on the intersection of metabolism with pathogenesis of sepsis, early detection, and clinical outcomes. We have identified a number of mechanisms involved in lipid metabolism that significantly influence important clinical outcomes in sepsis, represent novel biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification, and may lead to new targets for therapies.
Christian Lehmann
chlehmann@dal.ca
9024523813
Nova Scotia
Dalhousie University
Dalhousie University
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
  • Understanding the roles diabetes mellitus and glucose control have on outcomes in patients with sepsis
Professor CIHR themes/potential contributions: Biomedical: Experimental research on novel pharmacological approaches for the treatment of sepsis with a special focus on intravital imaging of the immune response in sepsis. Recently, our group published a comprehensive experimental study on the impact of insulin on the intestinal microcirculation in a model of sepsis-related hyperglycemia (Microvasc Res, 2018). Clinical: Intravital imaging of the immune response has a great potential to be utilized for human studies in sepsis (see Lehmann C, Clin Hemorheol Microcirc, 2018).
Pascal Lavoie
plavoie@cw.bc.ca
604-875-2135
British Columbia
Pascal Lavoie Biography
BC Children's Hospital Research Institute
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Clinician-Scientist, Associate Professor N/A
Sabah Hussain
sabah.hussain@muhc.mcgill.ca
514 843 1664
Quebec
McGill University Health Centre
McGill University Health Centre
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
Professor I study the mechanisms and prevention of skeletal muscle dysfunction in sepsis over the past 25 years
Liisa Holsti
liisa.holsti@ubc.ca 604-875 2000 ext 5200
British Columbia
UBC - Faculty of Medicine
UBC
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Associate Professor I am developing a new outcome tool to measure the neurodevelopmental impact of sepsis in children.
Anthony Shaw
Anthony.Shaw@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
204-984-4626
Manitoba
NRC - Medical Research Centre
NRC Winnipeg
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Research Officer Expertise in metabolic fingerprinting via infrared spectroscopy in particular. Strong interest in unlocking the potential for this approach for sepsis diagnosis and prognosis.
Richard Schulz
richard.schulz@ualberta.ca
780-492-6581
Alberta
Richard Schulz Biography
University of Alberta
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Professor I have an active interest and research background in understanding the roles of nitric oxide, peroxynitrite and matrix metallproteinases in cardiac and vascular dysfunction in sepsis.
Melissa Parker
parkermj@mcmaster.ca
Melissa J. Parker, McMaster University, Department of Pediatrics
McMaster University
  • Understanding the pathogenesis, causes and possible prevention of sepsis
  • Improving the prevention, detection and management of sepsis
Associate Professor of Pediatrics, McMaster University Clinician-Scientist trained in Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Critical Care Medicine and Clinical Research Methods with research focus in pediatric sepsis resuscitation.  Clinical trialist with translational and qualitative research collaborations.
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